View Poll Results: Which player(s) will win another Grandslam titile?

Voters
24. You may not vote on this poll
  • Roger Federer

    16 66.67%
  • Rafael Nadal

    9 37.50%
  • Serena Williams

    10 41.67%
  • Maria sharapova

    3 12.50%
  • Caroline Wozniacki

    1 4.17%
  • victoria Azarenka

    3 12.50%
  • Andy Murray

    7 29.17%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 504 of 504 FirstFirst ... 4404454494502503504
Results 5,031 to 5,040 of 5040

Thread: ►🎾★🎾 🏆 FK Tennis Court 🏆 🎾★🎾◄ New Year, New CHALLENGES

  1. #5031

    Default





  2. #5032
    F.K. VazhipokkaN BangaloreaN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    100,949

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Giggs View Post
    ee Big 3 ye pole oru long trophy winning career ( in Grand Slams ) ivarkku saadhyamaavumo ennu doubt aanu ...Grand Slams adikkumaayirikkum....oraal onnadikkumbol matte aal vere onnadikkum.. like that
    ee Big 3 pole uyarnnu varaan ulla potential ippol ulla aarrkkum kaanunnilla

    Djokovic is 32 ( younger of the Big 3 ) have a high chance to surpass Nadal and Fedex's total Grand Slams
    DJoker only enemy is injury.

    BIG3 pole oru domination udane undavilla.
    Thiem okke 3-4 French Open adikkenda team aanu.

  3. #5033

    Default

    From this ...



    to this



    Excellent comeback by Medvedev

  4. #5034
    F.K. VazhipokkaN BangaloreaN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    100,949

    Default

    Coco Gauff, 15, becomes the youngest tennis titlist in 15 years

    A tournament that began in defeat for Coco Gauff ended with the popular teen claiming her first tennis title.



    The 15-year-old from Florida became the youngest WTA winner since Nicole Vaidisova in 2004 when she downed 2017 French Open champion Jelena Ostapenko 6-3, 1-6, 6-2 in Linz, Austria, on Sunday.

    Gauff lost in the qualifying rounds but still made the tournament's main draw after another player pulled out with an injury. She then proceeded to reach her first quarterfinal, get her first top-10 win and bag her first title.
    "I'll definitely remember this moment for the rest of my life," Gauff told the crowd.
    Gauff had to wait to fully celebrate because the final point ended on an Ostapenko challenge. But once the match was official she raised her arms in celebration and let out a big smile as she looked at her box, where dad Corey and mom Candi were watching.

  5. #5035
    F.K. VazhipokkaN BangaloreaN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    100,949

    Default


  6. #5036
    F.K. VazhipokkaN BangaloreaN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    100,949

    Default


  7. #5037
    F.K. VazhipokkaN BangaloreaN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    100,949

    Default

    Roger Federer to become first living person to be celebrated on Swiss coins


    Roger Federer has won more Grand Slam singles titles than any other male playerSwitzerland's 20-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer will become the first living person to be celebrated on a coin in the country.
    The Federal Mint, Swissmint, will release a 20 Swiss francs silver commemorative coin in January.
    It plans to add a Federer SFr50 gold coin in May.
    "Thank you Switzerland and Swissmint for this incredible honour and privilege," said the 38-year-old world number three.


  8. #5038

    Default

    Novak Djokovic beats Dominic Thiem to win 17th Grand Slam



    Novak Djokovic defended his Australian Open crown and won a 17th Grand Slam after digging deep into his physical and mental reserves to beat Dominic Thiem in a gripping five-set final.

    The Serbian second seed won 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 for a record-extending eighth title at Melbourne Park.

    Djokovic, 32, twice called the doctor while trailing before fighting back.

    Austrian fifth seed Thiem, 26, still awaits his first major title after losing a third Grand Slam final

  9. #5039

  10. #5040
    F.K. VazhipokkaN BangaloreaN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    100,949

    Default

    'I'm saying goodbye': Maria Sharapova announces tennis retirement


    • Five-times grand slam winner calls time on career
    • ?How do you leave the only life you?ve ever known??


    Maria Sharapova, who announced her retirement from tennis on Wednesday, will be remembered in many corners of her sport with respect more than affection ? and it will not worry her much at all.
    The 32-year-old Russian who arrived in America from Sochi with her father in 1994 as refugees from the poison of Chernobyl ? with $700 and not a word of English between them ? won five grand slam titles and was ranked the highest earner in women?s sport for 11 years in a row. But it is her icy demeanour and failure to build on an early victory over Serena Williams that grab the imagination as much as those fine achievements.
    Sharapova, who beat Williams to win Wimbledon in 2004 when just 17, then lost 20 of their following 21 matches, was never universally popular in the locker room. She cared little about courting popularity, but she had the professional respect of her rivals for her single-mindedness and fighting spirit. Petra Kvitova, who beat Sharapova to win Wimbledon in 2011, was one of her few rivals to give her warm praise on Wednesday, describing her as a, ?big champion?.
    The Czech, who was sidelined from tennis after a knife attack in her apartment in 2016 but has returned to the upper reaches of the game, said on Twitter: ?I know how tough it is to come back and play. She has been injured a lot. Of course she wanted probably bigger success than ? her body allowed her to have.? She added: ?It was a pleasure to be with her on the tour, sharing the court with her. It was always great battles when we play together. So it?s been always nice to share the court with her and I do always have respect to her.?
    More than most players on the tennis circuit, Sharapova divided opinion. There were many players who objected to her early return from a drugs ban in 2017, after she had failed a test for the banned meldonium the previous year. Sharapova, who protested her innocence, had her two-year ban cut to 15 months, but was never the same player in a comeback that stuttered from one disappointing setback to the next, on the court and off. Her last tournament win was in a low-ranked event in China three years ago.
    Long-time problems with her serving shoulder recurred and, towards the end, she was losing to lesser players on a regular basis. There was a suspicion among some of her rivals and critics that she was playing merely for publicity to drive her many commercial interests, although she claimed she played for the love of the game and the competition. That was certainly evident in her trademark screeching and her relentless pursuit of lost causes on court, mainly from the baseline and with a two-handed backhand that was among the best in tennis. She made the most of the weapons she had ? including a powerful serve early in her career until injury struck on a regular basis ? and was rarely found close to the net. Hers was a game of calculation rather than inspiration.
    In her last match, a first-round loss to Donna Vekic at the Australian Open in January, Sharapova was ranked 373 in the world, a long way from her five separate reigns as world No 1, the first of them in 2005. It was her third first-round exit from a major in a row.
    However, five grand slam titles ? encompassing all the four venues, on clay, grass and hardcourt ? and career earnings of $38.7m tell a story of longevity and persistence, which Sharapova regarded as her greatest asset.
    Her rivalry with the younger of the two Williams sister was fierce but doomed ? and it defined Sharapova?s struggle. Their last encounter ? in the first round of the 2019 US Open, when Sharapova needed pain killers to get on court and could win only two games ? summed up the physical decline of the Russian.

    It always was. Sharapova regularly turned back questions about her looks as irrelevant, and protested that her many fashion shoots did not form the centrepiece of her career.?Behind closed doors, 30 minutes before taking the court, I had a procedure to numb my shoulder to get through the match,? she wrote in Vanity Fair, her chosen platform to confirm her retirement. ?I?ve had multiple surgeries ? once in 2008; another procedure last year ? and spent countless months in physical therapy. Just stepping on to the court that day felt like a final victory, when of course it should have been merely the first step toward victory. I share this not to garner pity, but to paint my new reality: My body had become a distraction.?
    ?Behind the photo shoots and the pretty tennis dresses, [the courts] exposed my imperfections ? every wrinkle, every drop of sweat,? she wrote. ?They tested my character, my will, my ability to channel my raw emotions into a place where they worked for me instead of against me. Between their lines, my vulnerabilities felt safe.?


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •