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Thread: FK-Technology-Multimedia-Gadget Update Thread-Know whats coming!

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    FK Citizen sillan's Avatar
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    Post FK-Technology-Multimedia-Gadget Update Thread-Know whats coming!


    Technology-Multimedia Update Thread

    When it comes to multimedia/electronic world our small kerala is very behind getting them here. For eg: First blue ray movie was released injune 2006[Charlie's Angels: Full throttle], we are still waiting for our first Blue ray title to come out.This thread is for Update from Technology-multimedia world. Inspiration came from a JC's AVATAR reivew thread here ,when somebody mentioned about watching it in 3D on TV.. So i say we are so close to see it in 3D on TV... as 3D HDTV's are announced already.All updates and reviews of whats new in TV,DVD/Bluray player/discs, mobile phones, computer/ laptop/notebooks and other Gadgets will be here as they come out... All are welcome to add to this thread if find something new and its from electronic/multimedia world...................



    LIST OF HDTV/DVD-BLUERAY SYTEM/MOBILE PHONES/COMPUTER/LAPTOPS/DIGITAL CAM WITH LINKS TO PAGE


    HDTV/DVD-Blue-Ray Systems

    1.
    Sony Bravia KDL 60LX903 3D HDTV Page3

    Mobile Phones

    1.
    Google Nexus Page 1
    2.
    Sony Ericsson Vivaz Page 2

    Computer/Laptops

    1.
    Apple iPad Page 2
    2. Nokia Booklet 3G Page 3

    Digital Camera/Camcorder

    1. Nikon D5000
    Page1


    MP3/VIDEO PLAYERS



    Other Gadgets

    Google Glass- Page 12


    Last edited by sillan; 05-16-2013 at 05:19 PM.

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    FK Citizen sillan's Avatar
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    3D TVs Grab Curious Eyes at CES 2009




    LAS VEGAS :— In the not-too-distant future, people on our television screens could be standing in our living rooms.
    Several TV manufacturers at the Consumer Electronics Show are exhibiting prototypes of 3D televisions. Donning dorky glasses, attendees are crowding the booths for Sony, Samsung and Panasonic to gaze into these concept TV sets, with the dream that one of these could end up in their homes.





    Sony stressed that its 3D TV is a concept product and therefore refused to comment on the technical details or even make a price estimate. But from our understanding, it appears to be stereoscopic 3D technology, which uses a combination of very expensive software and infrared emitters to enhance the visual depth perception.
    People can keep dreaming though. Currently, if these babies were to go to market today, they’d cost around $20,000. That’s the estimate provided by other manufacturers working on similar devices, at least.


    Last edited by sillan; 01-24-2010 at 09:35 PM.

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    FK Citizen sillan's Avatar
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    Nexus One Phone - Web meets phone.

    Google's Sexy Nexus One Pushes Android to New Limits


    You can now go to Google's website and pay Google directly for a phone that bears the search giant's corporate logo and the rather boring name of Nexus One. (Even if it is named after a robot in Blade Runner.)
    This is quite a shift from the company's original stance as a neutral distributor of the Android mobile operating system, used by multiple carriers on multiple handsets. Now Google is competing with the very manufacturers that use its OS.
    Building the Nexus One (or, to be precise, contracting HTC to build it) may well tick off Google's current and future Android partners. So, what features were so important to Google that it would take that risk?
    And why would you want to buy one at the seemingly steep, unsubsidized price of $530?
    The answers give a few clues to the next generation of smartphones: fast, always-connected, expandable and fully dependent on the internet. And while the Nexus One isn't completely there yet, it's a few steps closer to the ideal Android phone.
    No-BS sales model. Google wants to make it easier for people to buy phones, and once they buy them, to control their relationships with network carriers. So, you can buy an unlocked version for $530 (the phone works with "nearly all" GSM SIM cards, says Google) or pay $180 for a two-year contract with T-Mobile. Google says later on, there will be other carriers and other plans.
    I used my Nexus with T-Mobile, which had good 3G coverage in New York City and zero network coverage of any sort in my place in western Massachusetts. I was able to make phone calls, though, by swapping my SIM card with the one from my AT&T iPhone. (As Google acknowledges, this combination gives you voice calling, but not access to AT&T's 3G network. Bummer.)
    At $80 a month, the T-Mobile plan is $20 a month cheaper than what Verizon charges on the Droid Android phone. Hopefully, some of the future plans will be dirt-cheap, allowing people to amortize the initial cost of the unlocked phone.
    Cool Design. Physically, the Nexus One is as pleasing as any phone in the market. The HTC-manufactured device (built to Google's specs) is like an iPhone with curvy corners, cast in a classy burnished gray with a black frame around a brilliant 3.7-inch 800 x 400-pixel OLED (!) screen. There are four hard-wired touch controls on the bottom of that frame, including one that instantly brings up a search box. (Well, it is a Google phone.)
    The home screen features "live wallpaper," a dynamic and fun collection of animated backgrounds. It calls into question, though, whether this frill has a price. At one point, I peeked at the phone's power meter and found that screen was eating up half the energy. This is a real problem: When I failed to recharge the Nexus during the night, it would inevitably be dead the next morning. The battery's official ratings are impressive — seven hours 3G talk time, seven hours video. Indeed, talking or using media didn't run things down too quickly, but the promised and paltry five hours of 3G internet use — along with the drain from the screen — is an issue for a device that urges you to use the internet all the time.
    You can replace the removable battery on the fly, but Google clearly intends for customers to make use of the power management widget that dims the screen.
    The Nexus One offers one of the more coherent implementations of the Android interface, which can sometimes be a bit rough around the edges. It's easy to switch between the five screens that hold app icons and widgets, and you can get a thumbnail view of any of the screens by touching a dot on the home screen. Widgets are hit and miss: The Facebook widget just highlights single updates. But the constantly updating news and weather widget was always worth a look, as evidenced by the update onscreen as I write this: "Sheen's mother-in-law has misgivings."
    One of the signature design features of the Nexus is a tiny tricolor trackball that glows when you have messages or notices. This isn't terribly helpful for navigation because it's just as easy to scroll with your finger. As for the glow: Uh, don't we typically stash phones in our pockets?
    Like other Android phones, the Nexus One does not support multitouch gestures on the screen, so iPhone immigrants will be frustrated by the lack of two-finger maneuvers, especially when trying to resize web pages.
    Speed. One of Google's core values is that when things run things faster people use them more and like them more. True to its principles, Google has loaded the Nexus One with a speedy Qualcomm Snapdragon processor. I haven't done the metrics, but the thermometer meters that indicate how fast something loads on the Nexus definitely zip by faster than on other phones. The speed provides a halo effect that really heightens the pleasures of using the Nexus One.
    Heightened senses. Probably the best feature in the Nexus One is the ubiquitous voice recognition. Just about every time a text field appears — in search, in maps and even in e-mail — you can press a microphone key on the virtual keyboard and just say what you want to put in the field. If you take it easy and enunciate your words as if speaking to a fairly dense child, a reasonably accurate transcription of your words will appear on the screen. There are the usual cosmic misunderstandings, but expanding voice recognition is a welcome step toward our eventual liberation from Lilliputian physical keyboards and unforgiving soft keyboards.
    This brings up a puzzler: The Nexus One, like other recent Android phones, has a solid navigation system that makes use of Google Maps and GPS, and it doesn't cost anything. But the voice that gives you turn-by-turn instructions is the same grating metallic female voice heard on earlier versions. It's weird that a device built around speech recognition should lag so much in speech synthesis.
    The 5-megapixel camera, with zoom and flash and editing features, takes good pictures and clear video, and can location-stamp them with GPS.
    Super syncing with Google products. The Nexus One makes use of your Google account the way a peasant farmer utilizes a pig carcass — it uses almost every part. (Except Google Docs, which you can view from the browser, but without editing.)
    All you have to do is sign in to enable your e-mail, calendar, contacts, Picasa galleries (with a neat new interface for accessing photos) and Google Voice, the free application that organizes your phone activities and transcribes your voicemail. Google Voice doesn't work with the iPhone, and I had trouble making outgoing calls with it on the Droid. But it works like a charm with the Nexus.
    But when it comes to syncing with your computer, the Nexus isn't so great. This reflects Google's philosophy that if something ain't in the cloud, it probably ain't worth bothering about. Yes, you can plug a Nexus into your laptop via USB, but you have to trigger a command to mount it before the icon shows up, and then you have to drag the files over. Clearly Google would prefer that you use your Nexus One to hear music from Pandora or Last.FM and watch videos from TV.Com or YouTube, as opposed to the antiquated practice of copying and playing actual files.
    That's also probably why Google sniffs at the idea of building in gigabytes of onboard memory on the Nexus. The phone comes with a miserable 512 MB of built-in flash memory. Google's message for those who want to store MP3 files, photos or movies? Let them buy SD cards! (There's a slot for that, preloaded with a 4-GB card.)
    In other words, Google thinks a phone should be your connection to the cloud, which in turn hooks you to other humans, entertainment, the detritus of your professional life and, of course, any queries that can be answered by searching the vast Google indexes.
    The Nexus One does an impressive job of fulfilling that vision and is certainly the best Android phone yet. And if you are eager to jump off the merry-go-round of endless contracts with network carriers, Nexus One may well be the smart phone (and the business model) you've been waiting for.
    WIRED You can buy a Nexus One unlocked. Spiffy design. Bright screen. Runs Usain Bolt fast. The voice recognition works in virtually any text field.
    TIRED Awkward syncing with computers. Lacks multitouch gestures. Considering its central placement, the trackball is rather underwhelming.

    • Manufacturer: Google
    • Price: $530
    Last edited by sillan; 01-24-2010 at 09:42 PM.

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    Nalla Thread...

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    FK Citizen sillan's Avatar
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    thanx BR... check back to see more updates

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    NIKON D5000




    Main Features


    * New 2.7-in. 230k-dot Vari-angle monitor swings down approximately 90° and rotates 180°
    * Nikon DX-format CMOS image sensor with 12.3 effective megapixels and Integrated Dust Reduction System
    * Specially designed EXPEED image processing system
    * One-touch access to Live View, which includes face priority AF and subject tracking
    * D-SLR movie function: D-Movie, selectable from 320 x 216 pixels, 640 x 424 pixels or 1,280 x 720 pixels in AVI format
    * 19 Scene Modes that automatically adjust exposure, image processing, Active D-Lighting and other settings for superior image quality
    * Scene Recognition System, utilizing 420-pixel RGB sensor, improves autofocus, auto exposure and auto white balance performance and is also integrated with the Face Detection System
    * Active D-Lighting for smooth tone reproduction in high-contrast environments
    * Multi-CAM 1000 autofocus sensor module featuring 11 AF points provides fast and precise autofocus coverage across the frame
    * Picture Control System offers Portrait and Landscape options for more vibrant customized colors
    * Extensive palette of in-camera Retouch Menus including several new retouch options such as Soft Filter and Color Outline
    * Incredibly low-noise performance throughout a wide sensitivity range of ISO 200 to 3200; can be set to ISO 100 and ISO 6400 equivalents
    * Viewfinder with approx. 95% frame coverage and an easy-to-view 17.9 mm eyepoint (at -1.0 m-1)
    * Up to 4 fps continuous shooting
    * Built-in pop-up flash with Nikon's original i-TTL flash control
    * Highly efficient energy-saving design that allows approx. 510 images on a single charge of the Rechargeable Li-ion Battery EN-EL9a (CIPA standard, with AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR and flash fired at full power once every other shot.)
    * Compatible with HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) output
    * Included Nikon ViewNX software makes browsing and organizing your images easy
    * Optional photo-editing software Capture NX 2 allows quick and easy photo editing
    * Lightweight compact body



    Specifications:-


    Effective pixels: 12.3 million

    Image sensor: CMOS sensor, 23.6 x 15.8 mm; total pixels: 12.9 million; Nikon DX-format

    Image size (pixels): 4,288 x 2,848 [L], 3,216 x 2,136 [M], 2,144 x 1,424 [S]

    Sensitivity : ISO 200 to 3200 in steps of 1/3 EV. Can also be set to approx. 0.3, 0.7, or 1 EV (ISO 100 equivalent) below ISO 200, or to approx. 0.3, 0.7, or 1 EV (ISO 6400 equivalent) over ISO 3200, ISO sensitivity auto control available

    Storage media : SD memory cards, SDHC compliant

    Monitor: Vari-angle type, 2.7-in., approx. 230k-dot TFT LCD, approx. 100% frame coverage, and brightness adjustment

    Exposure metering: 3D Color Matrix Metering II, Center-Weighted and Spot Metering

    Exposure modes: Auto modes (auto, auto [flash off]), Advanced Scene Modes (Portrait, Landscape, Child, Sports, Close up, Night portrait, Night landscape, Party/indoor, Beach/snow, Sunset, Dusk/dawn, Pet portrait, Candlelight, Blossom, Autumn colors, Food, Silhouette, High key, and Low key), programmed auto with flexible program (P), shutter-priority auto (S), aperture-priority auto (A), manual (M)

    Interface : Hi-Speed USB

    Power sources : One Rechargeable Li-ion Battery EN-EL9a, AC Adapter EH-5a

    Dimensions (W x H x D): Approx. 127 x 104 x 80 mm (5.0 x 4.1 x 3.1 in.)

    Weight : Approx. 560 g (1 lb. 4 oz.) without battery, memory card, or body cap



    Style: DSLR
    Manufacturer: Nikon
    Price: $850
    Last edited by sillan; 01-30-2010 at 02:02 AM.

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    FK Citizen kiroo's Avatar
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    thanks sillan for infos...!!

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    Valare nalla thread, Thank you sillan!

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    FK Citizen sillan's Avatar
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    thanx kiran and unity for ur appreciation

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